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                                                     August 6th, 2001
             An easterly wave gives North Texas some thundershowers!
                           All shot from east edge of Plano, TX
 
 
   "Falling Turkey Tower"
   Time:  Who cares? It's summer!
   Location: From the east side of Plano, Tx.

    I thought another "turkey tower" would fire, but I was too impatient, and only caught the collapse of
    this one. Below, I boosted the contrast a little and its prettier, but also the noise is boosted too. If
    we could boost the contrast of *objects*, rather than pixels.....

    Same TL, but I boosted the contrast in post-production. Noise gets a little noisier, but I think this one looks
    'snappier'. Or is that "more snappy"?  Ah, this technical writing.   ;-(
 

 Timelapse of "Falling Turkey Towers"
   TL Speed: 120X : That's fast! 1 frame captured per 4 seconds!
   Location: Plano, TX
Straight of the capture...
Large -314k - (2.0 minutes @ 56kb)
Small -165k - (1.0 minutes @ 56kb)
Boosted the contrast...
Large -311k - (2.0 minutes @ 56kb)
Small -165k - (1.0 minutes @ 56kb)

 
   "Slow Glaciation"
   Time:  Who cares? It's summer!
   Location: From the east side of Plano, Tx.

Glaciation is the Meteorological term to describe the effects produced when "super-cool" water droplets finally
snap into a solid state. The 'super-cool' is somewhat of an understatement, as we're talking -40F!  These droplets
are so small that their surface tension keeps them liquid, but eventaully, as the updraft gets higher, the droplets turn
solid, or "glaciating", and form a wispy cirus anvil. 

I called it "Slow Glaciation" because note the compression ratio! 300:1 Extremely high, this amount of compression
will make a jet airliner, of which one or two should flash through the frame, would appear to be going 120,000
mph! On a 'good' spring day, with a decent 100 mph jet stream, the anvil shown here would an seem to scream
away at 30,000 mph! Whereas even with the 300:1 compression, it barely drifts away!

Note that there is very little, if any, rain core associated with this summer plume, although a similar cell to my
east did produce several lightning strokes, as evident by the thunder I heard.
 

 Timelapse of "Slow Glaciation"
   Time: 300X : That's extremely fast! 1 frame captured per 10 seconds! Actually lasts 40 minutes!
   Location: 
Huge -2830k - (16.0 minutes @ 56kb)
Large -1000k - (5.5 minutes @ 56kb)
Small -582k - (3.3 minutes @ 56kb)

 
   "The Double Helix"
   Time:  Who cares? It's summer!
   Location: From the east side of Plano, Tx.

After I loaded a new tape, I shot 2 more minutes of the "Slow Glaciation" above, just to see if I could splice
the two. Even at a 10 sec per interval jump that 300:1 is, I could see a slight discontinuity once spliced together,
and hence the extra 2 minutes did not get onto the production release above of "Slow Glaciation". 

Figuring there was little hope it would splice, I then whirled around to my east to catch the suns rays setting
on the two inter-twined updrafts here. The main 'pinkish' looking one above was wrapping around a thin,
dry looking updraft. One can see the rapid errosion of both updrafts as the downdraft takes over.
 

 Timelapse of "The Double Helix"
   Time: 120X : That's fast! 1 frame captured per 4 seconds!
   Location: 
Huge -1460k - (8.1 minutes @ 56kb)
Large -574k - (3.2 minutes @ 56kb)
Small -300k - (1.5 minutes @ 56kb)

 
 
   "Actually Purple"
   Time:  Who cares? It's summer!
   Location: From the east side of Plano, Tx.

First video I've seen of mine that has purple! Actual purple. :-)  Faintly seen in this timelapse, on the actual
video, it can be seen just above the near dark, low cumulus in the bright edge of the anvil.

I think I'll go back and pop the gamma on this one, so check back for a "New and Improved" version of this one.
 

 Timelapse of "Actually Purple"
   Time: 120X : That's fast! 1 frame captured per 4 seconds!
   Location: 
Huge -1890k - (10.5 minutes @ 56kb)
Large -748k - (4.2 minutes @ 56kb)
Small -389k - (2.2 minutes @ 56kb)